Tag Archives: History Cafe

Charles de Gaulle with Tim Little – Part II

Last time we discussed Charles de Gaulle’s life from his birth through to the beginning of World War II.  This time, we cover de Gaulle’s participation in World War II and his political actions in the post-war period.  For more information, see Part I. Continue reading Charles de Gaulle with Tim Little — Part II

Charles de Gaulle with Tim Little – Part I

Today on the History Cafe, we have part I of an extensive survey of the life of the French statesman and soldier, Charles de Gaulle. Our guest, Tim Little, served as the professor of history at Marlboro college for thirty-five years. He retired (more or less – he still teaches an occasional class) in 2009 and is now a professor emeritus.*  Tim has been interested in de Gaulle for some time and the talk uses de Gaulle as a sort of foil for understanding what it meant to be French and experience French history from the end of the 19th century until today.  De Gaulle died in 1970, but the republic he founded continues to this day with his fingerprints remain firmly a part of French political life.  The discussion was long enough that I have broken it up into two parts.  Continue reading Charles de Gaulle with Tim Little — Part I

Affective Piety with Lauren Mancia

Today we have the assistant professor of medieval history from Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Lauren Mancia.  Lauren works on monastic devotional practices and  culture in Normandy, specializing in the writings of the Abbot John of Fécamp (ca. 990-1078 A.D.)  In this podcast, she talks to us about a major shift in the understanding and relationship with Christ that began in the eleventh century.  Prior to that time, people tended to see Christ as more of a conquering hero, unafraid of death, and unsuffering on the cross.  After the shift to  what is known as “affective” piety, people began to emphasize Christ’s humanity and his sufferings and used that as a way to find emotional closeness with the divine.  This fundamental way of viewing Christ is still with us and remains the emotional core of most of western Christianity to this day. Continue reading Affective Piety with Lauren Mancia

Spices in Medieval Cuisine

This is the very first podcast from the History Cafe.  If you google spices in medieval cuisine, you will find fairly prevalently the myth that spices appeared so often and so heavily in medieval food because they covered up the taste of rancid meat (sometimes you get a more subtle version stating that spices help preserve food and prevent rancidness to begin with, which is at least somewhat true.)  At any rate, more and more work demonstrates quite convincingly that this explanation simply does not do justice to what we know about medieval cuisine and their love of spices.  A lot of work, in particular, has been done by my own dissertation advisor, Paul Freedman, so I dedicate this inaugural podcast to him.  You can also see some of his excellent lectures online through the Yale Courses feed. Continue reading Spices in Medieval Cuisine